The Candy Jar
radfordsechrist:

This weeks video is on perspectivehttps://gumroad.com/l/NFRw

radfordsechrist:

This weeks video is on perspective
https://gumroad.com/l/NFRw

eyecaging:

I really enjoy seeing other artists process under progress work.

Anatomy, Figure Drawing and Painting notes from Bryan Lee

storyshots:

Drawing from films

Drawing from films is a ridiculously useful exercise. It’s not enough to watch films; it’s not enough to look at someone else’s drawings from films. If you want to be in story, there’s no excuse for not doing this.

The way this works: you draw tons of tiny little panels, tiny enough that you won’t be tempted to fuss about drawing details. You put on a movie - I recommend Raiders, E.T., or Jaws… but honestly if there’s some other movie you love enough to freeze frame the shit out of, do what works for you. It’s good to do this with a movie you already know by heart.

Hit play. Every time there’s a cut, you hit pause, draw the frame, and hit play til it cuts again. If there’s a pan or camera move, draw the first and last frames.

Note on movies: Spielberg is great for this because he’s both evocative and efficient. Michael Bay is good at what he does, but part of what he does is cut so often that you will be sorry you picked his movie to draw from. Haneke is magnificent at what he does, but cuts so little that you will wind up with three drawings of a chair. Peter Jackson… he’s great, but not efficient. If you love a Spielberg movie enough to spend a month with it, do yourself a favor and use Spielberg.

What to look for:

  • Foreground, middle ground, background: where is the character? What is the point of the shot? What is it showing? What’s being used as a framing device? How does that help tie this shot into the geography of the scene? Is the background flat, or a location that lends itself to depth?
  • Composition: How is the frame divided? What takes up most of the space? How are the angles and lines in the shot leading your eye?
  • Reusing setups, economy: Does the film keep coming back to the same shot? The way liveaction works, that means they set up the camera and filmed one long take from that angle. Sometimes this includes a camera move, recomposing one long take into what look like separate shots. If you pay attention, you can catch them.
  • Camera position, angle, height: Is the camera fixed at shoulder height? Eye height? Sitting on the floor? Angled up? Down? Is it shooting straight on towards a wall, or at an angle? Does it favor the floor or the ceiling?
  • Lenses: wide-angle lens or long lens? Basic rule of thumb: If the character is large in frame and you can still see plenty of their surroundings, the lens is wide and the character is very close to camera. If the character’s surroundings seem to dwarf them, the lens is long (zoomed in).
  • Lighting: Notice it, but don’t draw it. What in the scene is lit? How is this directing your eye? How many lights? Do they make sense in the scene, or do they just FEEL right?

This seems like a lot to keep in mind, and honestly, don’t worry about any of that. Draw 100 thumbnails at a time, pat yourself on the back, and you will start to notice these things as you go.


Don’t worry about the drawings, either. You can see from my drawings that these aren’t for show. They’re notes to yourself. They’re strictly for learning. 

Now get out there and do a set! Tweet me at @lawnrocket and I’ll give you extra backpats for actually following through on it. Just be aware - your friends will look at you super weird when you start going off about how that one shot in Raiders was a pickup - it HAD to be - because it doesn’t make sense except for to string these other two shots together…

anatomicalart:

Let me link Yall’ to this holy grail.
I present to you Character Design Reference
on [Pintrest] || [Tumblr] || [Twitter] || [Facebook] || [YouTube]

I couldn’t even include all of the reference boards this blog contains on this photoset. That’s right! There’s EVEN MORE! There are pages and pages of them! It is an inspiration treasure trove!
Bookmark this link!
Fill your life with inspiration!

gonimontes:

I’m really enjoying these little process gifs. They’re large as hell though. Sorry? I dunno…
You can check out the separate stages of this process here.

gonimontes:

I’m really enjoying these little process gifs. They’re large as hell though. Sorry? I dunno…

You can check out the separate stages of this process here.

gonimontes:

I seldom start my illustrations with a solidified color scheme. It’s one of those aspects that still takes me a while to figure out. Color is no longer one of my weaknesses, but it doesn’t come to me as naturally as it does other artists. In the case of Kendare Blake’s When Gods and Vampires Roamed Miami, now up on Tor.com, it was pretty solid from the start. The story is fascinating. The author does a phenomenal job of evoking a visual through settings and character designs. It was hard to miss the direction the colors had to go. This was one of those rare occasions where the color scheme was present in as early as thumbnails.
You can see every single stage here.

gonimontes:

I seldom start my illustrations with a solidified color scheme. It’s one of those aspects that still takes me a while to figure out. Color is no longer one of my weaknesses, but it doesn’t come to me as naturally as it does other artists. In the case of Kendare Blake’s When Gods and Vampires Roamed Miami, now up on Tor.com, it was pretty solid from the start. The story is fascinating. The author does a phenomenal job of evoking a visual through settings and character designs. It was hard to miss the direction the colors had to go. This was one of those rare occasions where the color scheme was present in as early as thumbnails.

You can see every single stage here.

conceptcookie:

Exercise 29 Results: Back to Basics Step by Step

Check out our reference guide for the latest exercise on going back to basics on building values depending on your light direction HERE.

Thanks again to the great user submissions we received this time around!

conceptcookie:

Exercise 26: Shading Gems Results
Check out the results of our Shading Gems exercise here along with the explanation to create your own HERE!

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - FOLDSMore on folds today. I will eventually cover all types of folds but today is about simple folds on everyday clothes (t-shirt, jeans). The key is to know what to expect and then applying what you know to simplify what you see in front of you (when life drawing). A lot of the folds dynamics on shirts and jeans come from the “memory” of the fabric itself. Denim is thick and is likely to keep some form of wrinkles or folds around certain areas (knees). A lot of zig-zag patterns around the knee is very likely. When pushed down on the feet, the denim fabric will bunch up and combine with the zig-zag pattern. Shirts and t-shirts will react to the twist and pull of the arms and torso. Identify where the pull (or tension) is coming from and work from it. I tend to draw the seams because they clearly express the volumes underneath.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - FOLDS

More on folds today. I will eventually cover all types of folds but today is about simple folds on everyday clothes (t-shirt, jeans). The key is to know what to expect and then applying what you know to simplify what you see in front of you (when life drawing). A lot of the folds dynamics on shirts and jeans come from the “memory” of the fabric itself. Denim is thick and is likely to keep some form of wrinkles or folds around certain areas (knees). A lot of zig-zag patterns around the knee is very likely. When pushed down on the feet, the denim fabric will bunch up and combine with the zig-zag pattern. Shirts and t-shirts will react to the twist and pull of the arms and torso. Identify where the pull (or tension) is coming from and work from it. I tend to draw the seams because they clearly express the volumes underneath.

Norm

thesilvereye:

If you would like to request a tutorial, you can do so on this post over here!
Eye Coloring Tutorial by me | Other Eye Tutorials: 1 2 3 | My Resource list for Faces and Heads